What do you want?

Part 2 in a series

… “and in this box, I’d like you to write out personal vision statement

Is there anything more daunting? The prospect of filling that blankness with something deep, insightful or inspirational is overwhelming. It is soooo hard. Why?

It’s hard because this just isn’t how the  the brain forms new insights and it’s not how a creative process works.

Step 2 in a personal strategy process is to identify your vision.

The process that I use for a personal vision workshop is not rocket science, but it is highly effective. It works because it approaches a ‘vision’ statement from the bottom up, from the assembly of many ideas. It doesn’t ask for the big idea first.

Examine your data divorced from assumption.

A brainstorm mines your thoughts, desires and emotions for data points. Once the data points are assembled, they are examined without assumptions and in the context of other ideas that are also divorced from their assumptions. The next step is to look for the patterns and the deeper insight that the data point towards.

Brain science tells us that we form new ideas and new patterns when our brains are relaxed and able to form new neural pathways and knit old information together in new ways. This is one of the reasons we have our best thoughts in the shower first thing in the morning or when we’re out walking the dog.

Personal vision workshops create the opportunity to examine our own data points in a different context, in a relaxed and uncomplicated setting where new connections free to form and new relationships between ideas can be explored.

Where’s the value in spending time on personal vision?

By defining a personal vision, you create a frame from which to explore opportunities, evaluate options, create focus, eliminate distractions, and importantly, devise strategies for change and motion. If you can decide on your big picture aspiration, it is far easier to make smaller choices.

In a personal vision process, what matters most to you, in your complete life, will emerge.

You will define the pillars of your vision and an overall vision statement. Your pillars will be a reflection of the elements of your life that are most important to you. Often they include family, career, friends, learning, wellness and recreation.

My clients tell me they emerge inspired, excited, positively motivated, curious but firmly comfortable with their insights and discoveries. This is a great place from which to approach new chapters in your life, job hunting, big decisions or business opportunities.

Let’s get started on your vision statement.